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Not since Sydney Carton has literature created such an enigmatic character as the Rabbi. A true dissident in attitude and behavior and yet a faithful spiritualist at heart, the Rabbi tumbles headlong through life in a state of irritated bliss and cockeyed understanding.


I am reminded of Jesus saying: “We must become like little children to enter the kingdom of heaven.” Rabbi has mastered this. He sees the world as a simple creation where we are expected only to be grateful and kind. He has no time or inclination to obsess over the trivial pursuits of men.


Treat yourself to his enlightening and hilarious exploits as he twists and turns his way to a place where he knows nothing and everything, serves no one and everyone, through sheer goodness discovers the secrets of magic in this life. A cross between Siddhartha and Walter Mitty, no matter what strange situation the Rabbi finds himself in, it entertains and enlightens.Type your paragraph here.

​​​Throughout the ages, many people have wanted to converse with God, have claimed to have conversed with God, or have claimed God speaks to others through them. Here is another in a long line of prophets and charlatans who have written about just such conversations. In this case, however, the one conversing with God is neither a prophet nor a Con Artist. He is a Rabbi who wishes to understand reality.


As expected, God is full of cryptic answers, but he also has a surprisingly sharp sense of humor. Over the course of 100 days, our protagonist, Rabbi Schlotz, asks God all of the most important questions. (He  asks a number of inane ones, too.) In the end, we get a clear image of what God is like, jealousy, humor and all. But, not just on a level of classification and status, on a personal level, too.


Dip in a toe or plunge right in! A soak in these waters is good for the soul. Shallow or deep pools, there is something for everyone here, even God.

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These imaginary conversations between Rabbi Schlotz and Buddha constitute poetry and philosophies weaved together in hopes that readers find enjoyment.  The Buddha reached awakening or enlightenment but still died from either food poisoning or stomach problems. We all have to face death to complete our reincarnation life cycle in order to go on to more life and more death. 


Where the Buddha went on the other side of the veil is where we all want to go eventually.  Michael Thomas writes with the panache of a fool putting his pen in places where he wakes up with more than he gives in becoming less of a fool.These imaginary conversations between Rabbi Schlotz and Buddha constitute poetry and philosophies weaved together in hopes that readers find enjoyment.   


The Buddha reached awakening or enlightenment but still died from either food poisoning or stomach problems.  We all have to face death to complete our reincarnation life cycle in order to go on to more life and more death.  Where the Buddha went on the other side of the veil is where we all want to go eventually.  Michael Thomas writes with the panache of a fool putting his pen in places where he wakes up with more than he gives in becoming less of a fool.

The Rabbi is a person who has seen the sham façade of most people’s lives. His observations can be felt by some inner fear that others carry hidden within. As an old prophet decries falsity to the multitudes, the Rabbi’s quietude mirrors an outspoken judgement without injurious intent.To read these stories, one accepts intuition as the force of their revelations. The thunder of words is contrasted with the silence of understanding. There are two sides to life: One is the living; Two, is the consecration of dying. We give ourselves over to both as part of our being. We accept both as part of our non-being.Mysteries are wonders in the writings of Su Shih, who makes ordinary observations, sacred. The mysterious shadows become embodied flesh. The loneliness of chance becomes the self-security of fate. There is always the double-entendre of meanings in uplifting thoughts. There is always the miracle of loaves-and-fishes as we learn from our doubts becoming self-evident. That raw-brute-force of realization fits into our hearts with ease.​

​Rabbit Schlotz Series, By, Michael Thomas 

Imagine, if you will, a man who looks Lebanese, who studies Buddhism, who believes in the occult, and who fancies himself a Rabbi and a ladies man. A boy who thought he was a stud in his old pick-up truck. A boy who read books for pleasure, volunteered at the school library, and left home at 14 in his stud truck.


Is he a nerd? Probably. Is he a con man? Probably. Is he an intellectual? Probably. Is he blessed by God? Probably. Is he charming? Probably. Is he annoying? Probably. Can I be any more explicit? Probably not.


When the elements conspire to create certain conditions, what results is the perfect storm. When genes and experience conspire to create an environment of constant cognitive dissonance, what results is Rabbi Schlotz.


If I was going to try to create an analogy, and, believe me, I have been working at it for fortnights; I would say that Rabbi Schlotz was the equivalent of an intellectual giant baby chicken. The Baby Huey of the world of wisdom. And the collective keepers of the modality of the times were his protagonists. Like baby Huey, he was not attempting to be difficult. He was just being himself and it came naturally. I would think any well-adjusted adult could readily accept and deal with it. Unfortunately for Rabbi Schlotz, well-adjusted adults are extremely hard to come by in America.Type your paragraph here.

In this book, the Rabbi ponders everything from the mundane to the very essence of being through the lense of metaphysics. Come along and ponder how everything fits together, or doesn’t, as the Rabbi considers a wide and varied number of experiences and subjects, complete with his keen insight and his acerbic wit. Immerse yourself in a world of waddling through with one foot in the world of natural science and one foot in the metaphysical. It will be both a challenge and a delight.Type your paragraph here.

After a series of dialogues with God and Buddha, the Rabbi finds himself face to face with Satan: discussing the issues on his mind. Unfortunately, Satan is preoccupied with obtaining his soul. This makes the communication a bit more difficult and complicated. Shockingly, Satan seems to find our hero as annoying as the two enlightened beings did.


This leads to a sometimes very humorous, sometimes macabre series of conversations about the value of existence itself. Entertaining and informative, this third book in a series of Rabbi’s conversations is more visceral and grounded; after all, he is talking to the most powerful being in the earthly realm.Type your paragraph here.

The lovable curmudgeon with an oxymoronic identity is back with more of his off-beat perspective on reality. This time, the Rabbi takes off the gloves and lands haymakers on the chin of the "brave new world." You may agree, you may not, but it is almost certain that his views will help anyone distill their own. Thoughtful, bombastic and always entertaining, the Rabbi has sharpened his feather quill to put a fine point on these "Odds and Ends."Type your paragraph here.



This book is a continuation of the poems written by Michael Thomas. The theme of "Street Talk" is loosely chosen, but the idea was to try to make the selections more down-to-earth and immediate.   


Writing poems is rather more difficult than novels or technical works.  Poems need to be concise and scaled down in order to have an impact. The short time needed to get a point across is critical and, the elements of writing proposed by Aristotle are adhered to:  Plot - Character Development - Scene-by-Scene construction..


I like to write from a personal dialectic and conversational style, which gives me the freedom to pretend that I am talking to the reader. 
I have dedicated this book to all the readers who turn the pages to find something of interest.  


I thank all of you and hope you are rewarded.